Association of Neutralizing Antispike Monoclonal Antibody Treatment With Coronavirus Disease 2019 Hospitalization and Assessment of the Monoclonal Antibody Screening Score

Patrick w. Johnson, Katie l. Kunze, Jonathon w. Senefeld, Jorge e. Sinclair, Shahin Isha, Parthkumar h. Satashia, Shivang Bhakta, Jennifer b. Cowart, Wendelyn Bosch, Jack O’horo, Sadia z. Shah, Hani m. Wadei, Michael a. Edwards, Benjamin d. Pollock, Alana j. Edwards, Sidna Scheitel-Tulledge, Caroline g. Clune, Sara n. Hanson, Richard Arndt, Alexander HeyligerCory Kudrna, Dennis m. Bierle, Jason r. Buckmeier, Maria teresa a. Seville, Robert Orenstein, Claudia Libertin, Ravindra Ganesh, Pablo moreno Franco, Raymund r. Razonable, Rickey e. Carter, Devang k. Sanghavi, Leigh l. Speicher

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective

To test the hypothesis that the Monoclonal Antibody Screening Score performs consistently better in identifying the need for monoclonal antibody infusion throughout each “wave” of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) variant predominance during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic and that the infusion of contemporary monoclonal antibody treatments is associated with a lower risk of hospitalization.

Patients and Methods

In this retrospective cohort study, we evaluated the efficacy of monoclonal antibody treatment compared with that of no monoclonal antibody treatment in symptomatic adults who tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 regardless of their risk factors for disease progression or vaccination status during different periods of SARS-CoV-2 variant predominance. The primary outcome was hospitalization within 28 days after COVID-19 diagnosis. The study was conducted on patients with a diagnosis of COVID-19 from November 19, 2020, through May 12, 2022.

Results

Of the included 118,936 eligible patients, hospitalization within 28 days of COVID-19 diagnosis occurred in 2.52% (456/18,090) of patients who received monoclonal antibody treatment and 6.98% (7,037/100,846) of patients who did not. Treatment with monoclonal antibody therapies was associated with a lower risk of hospitalization when using stratified data analytics, propensity scoring, and regression and machine learning models with and without adjustments for putative confounding variables, such as advanced age and coexisting medical conditions (eg, relative risk, 0.15; 95% CI, 0.14-0.17).

Conclusion

Among patients with mild to moderate COVID-19, including those who have been vaccinated, monoclonal antibody treatment was associated with a lower risk of hospital admission during each wave of the COVID-19 pandemic.
Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)109-121
JournalMayo Clinic Proceedings: Innovations, Quality & Outcomes
Volume7
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2023
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Association of Neutralizing Antispike Monoclonal Antibody Treatment With Coronavirus Disease 2019 Hospitalization and Assessment of the Monoclonal Antibody Screening Score'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this