Association of green stem disorder with agronomic traits in soybean

C. Harbach, S. Chawla, C. R. Bowen, C. B. Hill, E. D. Nafziger, G. L. Hartman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Green stem disorder (GSD) of soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] is the occurrence of non-senescent, fleshy green stems of plants with normal, fully mature pods and seeds. The main focus of this study was to determine the relationship between GSD incidence and agronomic traits and to determine if GSD incidence was associated with soybean cultivars, years, location of trials, and rainfall. Data on GSD incidence based on a percentage of plants in plots showing symptoms were collected for soybean cultivars in 86 trials from 2009 to 2012 at seven locations in Illinois. The incidence of GSD ranged from 0% (three trials) to 88% with a mean incidence of 12% averaged over the 83 trials. The GSD incidence was correlated with data on yield, plant height and lodging, and seed moisture, protein, and oil content for all trials. The incidence of GSD was positively correlated (P < 0.05) with yield (12 cases), plant height (24) and lodging (29), and seed moisture (35), protein (19), and oil content (2), and negatively correlated (P < 0.05) with yield (eight cases), plant height (2) and lodging (3), and seed moisture (1), protein (3), and oil content (24). Correlations among agronomic traits, GSD, and in-season precipitation, indicated that yield and precipitation (May, June, and July) were negatively correlated (P < 0.05) with GSD. The incidence of GSD is a result of the genetics of soybean cultivars and how they interact with the environment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2263-2268
Number of pages6
JournalAgronomy Journal
Volume108
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2016

Fingerprint

agronomic traits
soybeans
stems
incidence
lodging
lipid content
seeds
cultivars
signs and symptoms (plants)
pods
Glycine max
proteins
protein content
rain
water content

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agronomy and Crop Science

Cite this

Harbach, C., Chawla, S., Bowen, C. R., Hill, C. B., Nafziger, E. D., & Hartman, G. L. (2016). Association of green stem disorder with agronomic traits in soybean. Agronomy Journal, 108(6), 2263-2268. https://doi.org/10.2134/agronj2016.03.0155

Association of green stem disorder with agronomic traits in soybean. / Harbach, C.; Chawla, S.; Bowen, C. R.; Hill, C. B.; Nafziger, E. D.; Hartman, G. L.

In: Agronomy Journal, Vol. 108, No. 6, 01.11.2016, p. 2263-2268.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harbach, C, Chawla, S, Bowen, CR, Hill, CB, Nafziger, ED & Hartman, GL 2016, 'Association of green stem disorder with agronomic traits in soybean', Agronomy Journal, vol. 108, no. 6, pp. 2263-2268. https://doi.org/10.2134/agronj2016.03.0155
Harbach, C. ; Chawla, S. ; Bowen, C. R. ; Hill, C. B. ; Nafziger, E. D. ; Hartman, G. L. / Association of green stem disorder with agronomic traits in soybean. In: Agronomy Journal. 2016 ; Vol. 108, No. 6. pp. 2263-2268.
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