Association between sucrose-phosphate synthase activity in leaves and plant growth rate in response to altered aerial temperature

Thomas W. Rufty, Steven C. Huber, Phillip S. Kerr

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Vegetative soybean plants (Glycine max (L.) Merrill, cv. 'Ransom') were grown at three aerial temperatures to examine the relationship between sucrose-phosphate synthase (SPS) activities of leaves and whole-plant growth rate. Plans were exposed for 17 days to day/night temperatures of 26/22°C, 22/18°C, or 18/14°C, or 18/14°C, which resulted in a progressive lowering of relative growth rates (0.129, 0.109 and 0.067 g g-1 day-1, respectively). Net CO2 exchange rates (CER), SPS activities and calculated assimilate export rates of the most recently expanded trifoliolate leaf in the canopy were decreased at lower temperatures. The temperature effects were reversible, as CER and SPS activities of selected expanded leaves were increased within 3 days after plants were switched from 18/14°C to 30/26°C and decreased following transfer from 26/22°C to 18/14°C/. The results are interpreted as evidence that changes in the activity of SPS are an integral part of the coordinatedadjustments in the leaf photosynthetic system which limit formation and export of sucrose as the temperature in the growth environment declines.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)7-12
Number of pages6
JournalPlant Science
Volume39
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1985

Keywords

  • Glycine max (L.) Merr.
  • assimilate export
  • sucrose phosphate synthase
  • temperature acclimation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics
  • Agronomy and Crop Science
  • Plant Science

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Association between sucrose-phosphate synthase activity in leaves and plant growth rate in response to altered aerial temperature'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this