Assessment of an injectable RFID temperature sensor for indication of horse well-being

J. R. Marsh, R. S. Gates, G. B. Day, G. E. Aiken, E. G. Wilkerson

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

This research investigated the performance and placement of an injectable radio frequency identification (RFID) and temperature sensor to monitor the body temperature of horses. Eleven sensors were calibrated to assess reliability (accuracy and repeatability) of the temperature readings. Results of four separate calibration trials demonstrated significant variability in both accuracy and repeatability. To quantify accuracy, the regression standard errors (SE) were placed into four performance categories: 4, 0, 2 and 3 excellent (SE 〈 0.5°C); 2, l, 7, and l good (0.5°C < SE 〈 0.75®C); 2, 3, 0, and 7 marginal (0.75°C < SE 〈 1.0°C); and 3, 7, 2, 0 poor (SE < l.0°C) sensors in each of the performance categories for the four calibration trials, respectively. Three of the eleven sensors evaluated were found to be repeatable, however, with marginal accuracy. Based on these results it is recommended that the temperature system be calibrated before use.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationLivestock Environment VIII - Proceedings of the 8th International Symposium
Pages921-928
Number of pages8
StatePublished - Dec 1 2008
Externally publishedYes
Event8th International Livestock Environment Symposium, ILES VIII - Iguassu Falls, Brazil
Duration: Aug 31 2008Sep 4 2008

Publication series

NameLivestock Environment VIII - Proceedings of the 8th International Symposium

Other

Other8th International Livestock Environment Symposium, ILES VIII
CountryBrazil
CityIguassu Falls
Period8/31/089/4/08

Keywords

  • Core body temperature
  • Equine
  • Instrumentation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Animal Science and Zoology

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