Assessing and predicting changes in vegetation cover associated with military land use activities using field monitoring data at Fort Hood, Texas

Alan B. Anderson, Guangxing Wang, Shoufan Fang, George Z. Gertner, Burak Güneralp, Don Jones

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

We assessed short-term impacts of changes in military training load on vegetative cover at Fort Hood, TX. From 1989 to 1995, permanent field transects were monitored for vegetative cover and land use disturbance using standard army monitoring methods [Land Condition Trend Analysis (LCTA)]. Land use intensity (training load) was quantified and used to develop a model to predict future vegetation cover values. We found that standard Army monitoring methods detected changes in installation resources associated with changes in training load. Increased training loads were associated with increased measures of disturbance, decreased ground cover, and decreased aerial vegetative cover. We found that the spatial pattern of disturbance and vegetation cover remained relatively constant over the study period despite large variations in overall training load. Our model used the consistency in spatial cover patterns over time and the strong relationship between training load and vegetation cover to predict the impact of future training loads on vegetation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)207-229
Number of pages23
JournalJournal of Terramechanics
Volume42
Issue number3-4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2005

Keywords

  • Inventory and monitoring
  • Land condition trend analysis
  • Vegetation impacts
  • Vehicle impacts

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Mechanical Engineering

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