Aspartate-132 in cytochrome c oxidase from Rhodobacter sphaeroides is involved in a two-step proton transfer during oxo-ferryl formation

Irina A. Smirnova, Pia Ädelroth, Robert B. Gennis, Peter Brzezinski

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The aspartate-132 in subunit I (D(I-132)) of cytochrome c oxidase from Rhodobacter sphaeroides is located on the cytoplasmic surface of the protein at the entry point of a proton-transfer pathway used for both substrate and pumped protons (D-pathway). Replacement of D(I-132) by its nonprotonatable analogue asparagine (DN(I-132)) has been shown to result in a reduced overall activity of the enzyme and impaired proton pumping. The results from this study show that during oxidation of the fully reduced enzyme the reaction was inhibited after formation of the oxo-ferryl (F) intermediate (τ ≃ 120 μs). In contrast to the wild-type enzyme, in the mutant enzyme formation of this intermediate was not associated with proton uptake from solution, which is the reason the DN(I-132) enzyme does not pump protons. The proton needed to form F was presumably taken from a protonatable group in the D-pathway (e.g., E(I-286)), which indicates that in the wild-type enzyme the proton transfer during F formation takes place in two steps: proton transfer from the group in the pathway is followed by faster reprotonation from the bulk solution, through D(I-132). Unlike the wild-type enzyme, in which F formation is coupled to internal electron transfer from CU(A) to heme a, in the DN(I-132) enzyme this electron transfer was uncoupled from formation of the F intermediate, which presumably is due to the impaired charge-compensating proton uptake from solution. In the presence of arachidonic acid which has been shown to stimulate the turnover activity of the DN(I-132) enzyme (Fetter et al. (1996) FEBS Lett. 393, 155), proton uptake with a time constant of ~2 ms was observed. However, no proton uptake associated with formation of F (τ ≃ 120 μs) was observed, which indicates that arachidonic acid can replace the role of D(I-132), but it cannot transfer protons as fast as the Asp. The results from this study show that D(I-132) is crucial for efficient transfer of protons into the enzyme and that in the DN(I-132) mutant enzyme there is a 'kinetic barrier' for proton transfer into the D-pathway.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)6826-6833
Number of pages8
JournalBiochemistry
Volume38
Issue number21
DOIs
StatePublished - May 25 1999

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry

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