As the states turned

Implications of the changing legal context of same-sex marriage on well-being

Brian Gabriel Ogolsky, J. Kale Monk, Te Kisha M. Rice, Ramona Faith Oswald

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Using a minority stress framework, we examined changes in personal well-being among individuals in same-sex relationships during the transition to federal marriage recognition. Longitudinal panel data from 279 individuals were collected once before and at three time points after the U.S. Supreme Court decision in the Obergefell vs. Hodges case that resulted in federal recognition of same-sex marriage. Prior to the ruling, levels of internalized homonegativity, isolation, and vicarious trauma were positively associated with psychological distress. Levels of felt stigma and vicarious trauma were negatively associated with life satisfaction. Following the ruling, trajectories of psychological distress decreased over time for individuals who experienced higher (vs. lower) initial levels of internalized homonegativity, isolation, and vicarious trauma. Trajectories of life satisfaction increased over time for individuals who experienced higher (vs. lower) initial levels of vicarious trauma. These changes occurred over and above the effects of state and local recognition and marital status.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3219-3238
Number of pages20
JournalJournal of Social and Personal Relationships
Volume36
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2019

Fingerprint

Marriage
trauma
marriage
well-being
Trajectories
social isolation
Supreme Court Decisions
Psychology
satisfaction with life
Marital Status
court decision
marital status
Supreme Court
minority
Compassion Fatigue
time

Keywords

  • Discrimination
  • HDFS
  • LGBTQ
  • family policy
  • family relations
  • minority stress
  • psychology
  • same-sex marriage
  • satisfaction
  • stress
  • well-being

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Communication
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Sociology and Political Science

Cite this

As the states turned : Implications of the changing legal context of same-sex marriage on well-being. / Ogolsky, Brian Gabriel; Monk, J. Kale; Rice, Te Kisha M.; Oswald, Ramona Faith.

In: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Vol. 36, No. 10, 01.10.2019, p. 3219-3238.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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