Armenia aeterna: Commemorative heritage in sound, sculpture, and movement from Bulgaria's Armenian diaspora

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

In anticipation of April 2015, the Armenian State Centennial Commemoration Commission, established by Presidential decree on April 23, 2011, adopted a floral symbol, a purple forget-me-not, to promote awareness of the upcoming centenary of the Ottoman Turkish pogrom against Anatolian Armenians. Bulgaria's contemporary Armenian diaspora comprises a more established community of Anatolian or western Armenians, largely descendants of refugees from Istanbul and Turkish Thrace displaced between 1894 and 1922, and Caucasus or eastern Armenians who have immigrated from the post-Soviet Republic since 1991. Eastern and western Armenians speak almost mutually unintelligible dialects, and the community remains fairly segregated. After the Easter morning liturgy, about 300 community members made pilgrimage on foot from the present Armenian church and cultural center to "Erevan," located a half-mile away. The Great Catastrophe has been commemorated annually in Sofia at a small park called "Erevan," a gift to the Armenian community from city mayor Boiko Borisov.
Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationHeritage of Death
Subtitle of host publicationLandscapes of Emotion, Memory and Practice
EditorsMattias Frihammar, Helaine Silverman
PublisherTaylor and Francis
Pages147-163
Number of pages17
ISBN (Electronic)9781315440194
ISBN (Print)9781138217515
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 28 2017

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences(all)

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    Buchanan, D. A. (2017). Armenia aeterna: Commemorative heritage in sound, sculpture, and movement from Bulgaria's Armenian diaspora. In M. Frihammar, & H. Silverman (Eds.), Heritage of Death: Landscapes of Emotion, Memory and Practice (pp. 147-163). Taylor and Francis. https://doi.org/10.4324/9781315440200-11