Area selective CVD of metallic films from molybdenum, iron, and ruthenium carbonyl precursors: Use of ammonia to inhibit nucleation on oxide surfaces

Elham Mohimi, Zhejun V. Zhang, Sumeng Liu, Justin L. Mallek, Gregory S. Girolami, John R. Abelson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The authors demonstrate that the addition of an ammonia coflow during the chemical vapor deposition of MoCxNy, Fe, or Ru thin films at ≤200 °C from the metal carbonyl precursors Mo(CO)6, Fe(CO)5, or Ru3(CO)12 affords area-selective growth: film grows readily on titanium metal or vanadium nitride substrate surfaces, but no nucleation occurs on air-exposed SiO2, TiO2, Al2O3, or MgO within the investigated times of 1-2 h. By contrast, in the absence of ammonia, nucleation and deposition on these oxide surfaces can either be slow or rapid, depending strongly on the oxide surface preparation. NH3 is also the source of N in MoCxNy, which has a resistivity of 200 μΩ cm and becomes superconducting at a critical temperature of 4 K. The authors hypothesize that the passivating effect of NH3 on oxide surfaces involves site blocking to prevent precursor adsorption, or an acid-base interaction to stabilize surface-bound metal subcarbonyl intermediates, or a combination of these mechanisms. A key finding is that surface selective growth is often crucially dependent on the sample history of the substrate, which must be specified in detail if reproducible results are to be obtained.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number041507
JournalJournal of Vacuum Science and Technology A: Vacuum, Surfaces and Films
Volume36
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2018

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Surfaces and Interfaces
  • Surfaces, Coatings and Films

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