Are Specific Emotion Regulation Strategies Differentially Associated with Posttraumatic Growth Versus Stress?

Sadie E. Larsen, Howard Berenbaum

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Extremely few studies have examined emotion regulation strategies as predictors of posttraumatic growth (PTG). This study aimed to examine several specific emotion regulation strategies, along with meaning making, as predictors of PTG, as opposed to posttraumatic distress. Participants were 107 adult women who had experienced a very stressful or traumatic event within the past 3 years and completed questionnaires measuring emotion regulation, meaning making, distress, and PTG. Emotion suppression positively predicted distress, but not PTG. Meaning making positively predicted PTG and negatively predicted distress. Bootstrapped mediation models showed that emotional processing has a significant indirect effect on PTG and distress through its effect on meaning making. Results indicate that researchers should pay closer attention to emotional processes involved in etiological models of PTG. It might also be helpful to examine specific emotion regulation strategies, as these can point to ways to help people navigate recovery from trauma.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)794-808
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Aggression, Maltreatment and Trauma
Volume24
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 9 2015

Keywords

  • emotion regulation
  • meaning making
  • posttraumatic growth
  • posttraumatic stress
  • stressful events
  • traumatic events

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Professions (miscellaneous)
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Are Specific Emotion Regulation Strategies Differentially Associated with Posttraumatic Growth Versus Stress?'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this