Are College Students More Likely to Be Food Insecure than Nonstudents of Similar Ages?

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

“College hunger” has received a great deal of attention in the media and on some campuses across the US. In this article, I consider the question: Are college students more likely to be food insecure than those of similar ages who are not in college? To answer this question, I use data from the 2014 to 2018 Current Population Survey (CPS), the data used for the official food insecurity rates in the US. Across many specifications, I find zero evidence that college students are at higher risk of food insecurity than nonstudents. This holds whether one looks at those between the ages of eighteen and twenty-five or between twenty-six and thirty; whether one looks at “person is a child of the respondent” or “person is not a child of the respondent”; or whether one looks at demographic categories. In fact, food insecurity rates are up to twice as high among nonstudents in comparison to full-time college students.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalApplied Economic Perspectives and Policy
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2020

Keywords

  • college
  • food insecurity
  • hunger

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Development
  • Economics and Econometrics

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