Applied Physics: Quantum interference device made by DNA templating of superconducting nanowires

David S. Hopkins, David Pekker, Paul M. Goldbart, Alexey Bezryadin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The application of single molecules as templates for nanodevices is a promising direction for nanotechnology. We used a pair of suspended DNA molecules as templates for superconducting two-nanowire devices. Because the resulting wires are very thin, comparable to the DNA molecules themselves, they are susceptible to thermal fluctuations typical for one-dimensional superconductors and exhibit a nonzero resistance over a broad temperature range. We observed resistance oscillations in these two-nanowire structures that are different from the usual Little-Parks oscillations. Here, we provide a quantitative explanation for the observed quantum interference phenomenon, which takes into account strong phase gradients created in the leads by the applied magnetic field.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1762-1765
Number of pages4
JournalScience
Volume308
Issue number5729
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 17 2005

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Applied Physics: Quantum interference device made by DNA templating of superconducting nanowires'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this