Antecedents of intention to help mitigate wildfire: Implications for campaigns promoting wildfire mitigation to the general public in the wildland-urban interface

Benjamin R. Bates, Brian L. Quick, Aaron A. Kloss

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The current investigation sought to examine the association between knowledge of the causes of wildfire in the wildland-urban interface (WUI) and intentions on the part of members of the public to help mitigate wildfire. In doing so, antecedents from the theory of planned behavior were employed to enhance our understanding of the relationships among wildfire knowledge, attitudes, subjective norms, perceived behavioral control, and intention to help mitigate wildfire in the WUI. Participants (N = 408) living in the WUI in Appalachian Ohio were sampled as a means of conducting formative research prior to developing messages promoting wildfire mitigation. Our results reveal that, among the variables in the theory of planned behavior, the only paths that consistently explain individual's intention to help mitigate wildland fire in the WUI in protecting both homes and the environment are associations between knowledge about wildfire and perceived behavioral control and between perceived behavioral control and intention. Our findings are discussed with a focus on message design for wildland fire mitigation professionals and a focus on implications for the theory of planned behaviors for academics with interests in wildland fire and other environmental issues.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)374-381
Number of pages8
JournalSafety Science
Volume47
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2009

Keywords

  • Fire prevention
  • Homeowners
  • Theory of planned behavior
  • Wildfire

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Safety, Risk, Reliability and Quality
  • Safety Research
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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