Anger Style, Psychopathology, and Regional Brain Activity

Jennifer L. Stewart, Rebecca Levin-Silton, Sarah M. Sass, Wendy Heller, Gregory A. Miller

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Depression and anxiety often involve high levels of trait anger and disturbances in anger expression. Reported anger experience and outward anger expression have recently been associated with left-biased asymmetry of frontal cortical activity, assumed to reflect approach motivation. However, different styles of anger expression could presumably involve different brain mechanisms and/or interact with psychopathology to produce various patterns of brain asymmetry. The present study explored these issues by comparing resting regional electroencephalographic activity in participants high in trait anger who differed in anger expression style (high anger-in, high anger-out, both) and participants low in trait anger, with depression and anxiety systematically assessed. Trait anger, not anger-in or anger-out, predicted left-biased asymmetry at medial frontal EEG sites. The anger-in group reported higher levels of anxious apprehension than did the anger-out group. Furthermore, anxious apprehension moderated the relationship between trait anger, anger-in, and asymmetry in favor of the left hemisphere. Results suggest that motivational direction is not always the driving force behind the relationship of anger and left frontal asymmetry. Findings also support a distinction between anxious apprehension and anxious arousal.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)701-713
Number of pages13
JournalEmotion
Volume8
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2008

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Anger
Psychopathology
Brain
Anxiety
Depression
Arousal

Keywords

  • EEG
  • STAXI
  • anger
  • brain asymmetry
  • psychopathology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Stewart, J. L., Levin-Silton, R., Sass, S. M., Heller, W., & Miller, G. A. (2008). Anger Style, Psychopathology, and Regional Brain Activity. Emotion, 8(5), 701-713. https://doi.org/10.1037/a0013447

Anger Style, Psychopathology, and Regional Brain Activity. / Stewart, Jennifer L.; Levin-Silton, Rebecca; Sass, Sarah M.; Heller, Wendy; Miller, Gregory A.

In: Emotion, Vol. 8, No. 5, 01.10.2008, p. 701-713.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Stewart, JL, Levin-Silton, R, Sass, SM, Heller, W & Miller, GA 2008, 'Anger Style, Psychopathology, and Regional Brain Activity', Emotion, vol. 8, no. 5, pp. 701-713. https://doi.org/10.1037/a0013447
Stewart JL, Levin-Silton R, Sass SM, Heller W, Miller GA. Anger Style, Psychopathology, and Regional Brain Activity. Emotion. 2008 Oct 1;8(5):701-713. https://doi.org/10.1037/a0013447
Stewart, Jennifer L. ; Levin-Silton, Rebecca ; Sass, Sarah M. ; Heller, Wendy ; Miller, Gregory A. / Anger Style, Psychopathology, and Regional Brain Activity. In: Emotion. 2008 ; Vol. 8, No. 5. pp. 701-713.
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