Analysis of single- and multi-family residential electricity consumption in a large urban environment: Evidence from Chicago, IL

Jorge E. Pesantez, Grace E. Wackerman, Ashlynn S. Stillwell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Natural and human-caused extreme events can alter residential electricity demand in urban areas and stress the electricity grid, with different types of residential electricity consumers exhibiting different consumption patterns. Residential electricity demands have been widely analyzed considering single-family consumers; however, multi-family consumption patterns remain comparatively understudied. The deployment of smart electricity meters enables the identification of single- and multi-family residential electricity consumption patterns at high temporal resolution. Using smart electricity meter data for the greater Chicago area, we compare electricity demand profiles reported by smart meters from single- and multi-family consumers in a large and diverse urban environment to understand residential electricity patterns better. Our study comprehensively analyzes the daily electricity demand profiles of these two types of residential consumers to identify peak electricity consumption times and magnitudes. Results show that the electricity demand of both residential end-users follows similar time of use patterns, and single-family users approximately double the demand of multi-family users on a per household basis. We also present predictive models of the electricity demand with socioeconomic data at the zip code level. Predictive model results show that multiple linear regression models explain up to 62% and 41% of the mean daily electricity (MDE) demand of single- and multi-family users, respectively. The median age of occupants, percent age 65 and older, mean commute time, and percent high school or higher education are statistically significant predictors of the MDE demand of single-family users, with percent high school or higher education having the highest relative importance. Similarly, median building age, percent multi-family, percent female, median age of occupants, and mean commute time are statistically significant predictors of multi-family electricity consumption, with median age of occupants having the highest relative importance. Modeling electricity demand to uncover differences between single- and multi-family residential electricity demands can assist city planners and utility managers to develop tailored demand management strategies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number104250
JournalSustainable Cities and Society
Volume88
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2023

Keywords

  • Demand management
  • Electricity usage
  • Socioeconomic predictors
  • Urban environment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • Civil and Structural Engineering
  • Renewable Energy, Sustainability and the Environment
  • Transportation

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Analysis of single- and multi-family residential electricity consumption in a large urban environment: Evidence from Chicago, IL'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this