Analysis of blood leukocytes in a naturally occurring immunodeficiency of pigs shows the defect is localized to B and T cells

C. L. Ewen, A. G. Cino-Ozuna, H. He, M. A. Kerrigan, J. C.M. Dekkers, C. K. Tuggle, R. R.R. Rowland, C. R. Wyatt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) is the result of a set of inherited genetic defects which render components of the immune response nonfunctional. In Arabian horses, Jack Russell terriers, and mice, the disorder is a consequence of the absence of T and B lymphocytes, while natural killer (NK) cell and other leukocyte populations remain intact. Preliminary analysis of a naturally acquired form of inherited SCID in a line of pigs showed several defects in the architecture and composition of secondary lymphoid organs. In this study, a quantitative assessment of lymphocyte populations in affected and normal littermates showed depleted T or B lymphocyte populations in affected pigs; however, NK cells and neutrophils were present in numbers comparable to unaffected littermates. The results indicate that the immune defect in pigs shares the same features as other SCID-affected species.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)174-179
Number of pages6
JournalVeterinary Immunology and Immunopathology
Volume162
Issue number3-4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 15 2014
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Lymphocytes
  • Severe combined immunodeficiency
  • Swine

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • veterinary(all)

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