An online process model of second-order cultivation effects: How television cultivates materialism and its consequences for life satisfaction

L. J. Shrum, Jaehoon Lee, James E. Burroughs, Aric Rindfleisch

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Two studies investigated the interrelations among television viewing, materialism, and life satisfaction, and their underlying processes. Study 1 tested an online process model for television's cultivation of materialism by manipulating level of materialistic content. Viewing level influenced materialism, but only among participants who reported being transported by the narrative, supporting a process model in which cultivation effects for value judgments occur online during viewing. Study 2 further investigated television's cultivation of materialism and its consequences for life satisfaction. A survey of U.S. respondents found cultivation effects for materialism and life satisfaction, and materialism mediated the cultivation effect for life satisfaction, suggesting that television's specific cultivation of materialism (proximal effect) mediates a more general cultivation effect for life satisfaction (distal effect).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)34-57
Number of pages24
JournalHuman Communication Research
Volume37
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2011
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Communication
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Anthropology
  • Linguistics and Language

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