An Individual Differences Analysis of Ability and Strategy Influences: Age-Related Differences in Associative Learning

Wendy A. Rogers, Christopher Hertzog, Arthur D. Fisk

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The relationships among abilities, strategies, and performance on an associative learning task were investigated for young (aged 17 to 34) and older adults (aged 60 to 82). Participants received extensive practice on a noun-pair task in which they could use a visual-scanning strategy or a memory-retrieval strategy. Older adults were more likely to use the scanning strategy. Age differences were reduced when comparisons were made only for participants using a retrieval strategy. Associative memory was predictive of learning on the task, and semantic memory access speed was predictive of practiced performance. Practiced performance on a memory-search task that also required associative learning was predictive of practiced noun-pair performance. Models of ability-performance relationships for skill acquisition are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)359-394
Number of pages36
JournalJournal of Experimental Psychology: Learning Memory and Cognition
Volume26
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2000

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Language and Linguistics
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Linguistics and Language

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