An experimental method to identify the effects of joints on structures using laser vibrometry

Xianghong Ma, Alexander F. Vakakis, Lawrence A. Bergman

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Abstract

A technique based on laser vibrometry is outlined for identifying the effects of bolted joints on the structural dynamics. The method is based on the comparison of the dynamics of the bolted structure to that of a "baseline" structure; e.g., a structure with similar geometry and material characteristics but no jointed interface. Hence, under identical forcing conditions, the difference in the dynamics between the actual and baseline structures can be attributed solely to the joint interface effects. Non-contacting laser vibrometry is utilized to experimentally measure these differences in the structural responses at specific frequencies. A numerical algorithm is then developed to post-process the experimental data and identify the joint effects on the dynamics. The method provides estimates for the equivalent, frequency and amplitude dependent complex modulus of the joint interface. The laser scans of the mode shapes of the systems under consideration reveal interesting dynamic phenomena such as nonlinear effects due to micro-impacts at the bolted joint as well as effects due to non-proportional damping distribution.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages1831-1837
Number of pages7
StatePublished - Dec 1 2001
Event18th Biennial Conference on Mechanical Vibration and Noise - Pittsburgh, PA, United States
Duration: Sep 9 2001Sep 12 2001

Other

Other18th Biennial Conference on Mechanical Vibration and Noise
CountryUnited States
CityPittsburgh, PA
Period9/9/019/12/01

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Modeling and Simulation
  • Mechanical Engineering
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Computer Graphics and Computer-Aided Design

Cite this

Ma, X., Vakakis, A. F., & Bergman, L. A. (2001). An experimental method to identify the effects of joints on structures using laser vibrometry. 1831-1837. Paper presented at 18th Biennial Conference on Mechanical Vibration and Noise, Pittsburgh, PA, United States.