An Analytical Autoethnographical Account of using Inquiry-Based Learning in a Graduate Research Methods Course

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Increased emphasis is being placed on integrating research and teaching in higher education because of the numerous benefits accrued by students. In accordance, research methods courses are ubiquitously contained in curricula, ostensibly to promote research training and the research-teaching nexus. Students may not appreciate the inclusion, however, of such courses or emphasis on research training when their career ambitions are outside academia. In this analytical autoethnographic study, I examined my experience of teaching research methods to twenty graduate students using an inquiry-based learning strategy. To assist my analysis, I incorporated the students’ reflective journals of their experience of the course. Inquiry based learning motivated both the students and me, however the approach was time intensive and stressful for me. Contrary to current recommendations, guidance is of crucial importance with this teaching approach, particularly at the onset. Furthermore, an alignment between my own research interests and course content was not necessary for the research-teaching nexus to be experienced. Moreover, absence of such alignment provided opportunities for personal development both for the students and in my case, the instructor.
Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number5
JournalThe Canadian Journal for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning
Volume8
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2017
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • research-teaching nexus
  • learning-centred
  • sport management
  • inquiry-based learning

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'An Analytical Autoethnographical Account of using Inquiry-Based Learning in a Graduate Research Methods Course'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this