An all-digital cantilever controller for MRFM and scanned probe microscopy using a combined DSP/FPGA design

Dick De Roover, La Moyne Porter, Abbas Emami-Naeini, John A. Marohn, Seppe Kuehn, Sean Garner, Doran D. Smith

Research output: Contribution to specialist publicationArticle

Abstract

SC Solutions, Sunnyvale, CA, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY and the U.S. Army Research Laboratory, Adelphi, MD, worked jointly to develop an all-digital cantilever controller for magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM) using a combined digital signal processor (DSP)/ field-programmable gate array (FPGA) design. One of the significant advantages of the all-digital cantilever controller was its absence of thermal drift and as effective tuning flexibility. The controller comprised a FPGA connected via a low-latency interface to an analog input and an analog output and a DSP with additional analog outputs. The performance of the controller was demonstrated in investigations employing ultrasensitive silicon microcantilevers fabricated at Cornell University's Nanoscale Science and Technology Facility. The results revealed that the digital MRFM controller performed without the need to know the exact cantilever resonance frequency.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages12-16
Number of pages5
Volume40
No8
Specialist publicationAmerican Laboratory
StatePublished - Apr 1 2008
Externally publishedYes

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Atomic Force Microscopy
Digital signal processors
Magnetic resonance
Field programmable gate arrays (FPGA)
Microscopy
Microscopic examination
Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy
Controllers
Silicon
Hot Temperature
Technology
Research
Research laboratories
Tuning

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Chemistry(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

Cite this

De Roover, D., Porter, L. M., Emami-Naeini, A., Marohn, J. A., Kuehn, S., Garner, S., & Smith, D. D. (2008). An all-digital cantilever controller for MRFM and scanned probe microscopy using a combined DSP/FPGA design. American Laboratory, 40(8), 12-16.

An all-digital cantilever controller for MRFM and scanned probe microscopy using a combined DSP/FPGA design. / De Roover, Dick; Porter, La Moyne; Emami-Naeini, Abbas; Marohn, John A.; Kuehn, Seppe; Garner, Sean; Smith, Doran D.

In: American Laboratory, Vol. 40, No. 8, 01.04.2008, p. 12-16.

Research output: Contribution to specialist publicationArticle

De Roover, D, Porter, LM, Emami-Naeini, A, Marohn, JA, Kuehn, S, Garner, S & Smith, DD 2008, 'An all-digital cantilever controller for MRFM and scanned probe microscopy using a combined DSP/FPGA design' American Laboratory, vol. 40, no. 8, pp. 12-16.
De Roover D, Porter LM, Emami-Naeini A, Marohn JA, Kuehn S, Garner S et al. An all-digital cantilever controller for MRFM and scanned probe microscopy using a combined DSP/FPGA design. American Laboratory. 2008 Apr 1;40(8):12-16.
De Roover, Dick ; Porter, La Moyne ; Emami-Naeini, Abbas ; Marohn, John A. ; Kuehn, Seppe ; Garner, Sean ; Smith, Doran D. / An all-digital cantilever controller for MRFM and scanned probe microscopy using a combined DSP/FPGA design. In: American Laboratory. 2008 ; Vol. 40, No. 8. pp. 12-16.
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