An alkalinizing oral rehydration solution containing lecithin-coated citrus fiber is superior to a nonalkalinizing solution in treating 360 calves with naturally acquired diarrhea

G. M. Goodell, J. Campbell, L. Hoejvang-Nielsen, W. Stansen, P. D. Constable

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The aim of this field study was to compare the efficacy and cost of 2 commercially available oral rehydration therapy (ORT) solutions in treating dairy calves with naturally acquired diarrhea. A total of 1,349 newborn Holstein-Friesian calves were prospectively enrolled in the study. Calves were housed in individual hutches and fed a mixture of pasteurized hospital milk and an all-milk protein milk replacer twice per day. Calves were monitored twice each day from d 2 of life until 30. d of age for the presence or absence of diarrhea, and were assigned a fecal score and a hydration score at each examination. Calves that developed mild to severe diarrhea that did not need intravenous fluids and did not have clinical evidence of concurrent disease (n = 360) were assigned randomly to receive 1 of 2 commercial ORT solutions: a hypertonic alkalinizing ORT containing lecithin-coated citrus fibers (Diaque, group D, n = 180; Boehringer Ingelheim, Ingelheim, Germany), and an isotonic nonalkalinizing ORT (RE-SORB, group R, n = 180; Pfizer Animal Health, New York, NY) for 2 to 8. d; the duration of treatment depended on whether diarrhea was still present. No significant differences were observed in mortality rates or treatment failure rates between the 2 treatment groups. Fecal consistency returned to normal more quickly in group D calves than in group R calves; consequently, group D calves were treated for 1. d less than were group R calves. The increase in body weight after 4. d of treatment was larger in group D than in group R. The average daily gain from birth to weaning in calves that did not develop concurrent disease (such as pneumonia) during the study period tended to be higher in group D calves (0.53 ± 0.11. kg/d) than in group R calves (0.51 ± 0.09. kg/d). The smaller number of treatments at a lower cost per treatment produced a cost advantage of $4.82 per treated calf in group D calves compared with group R calves. Our findings support the concept that milk should continue to be fed to diarrheic calves that are being administered an ORT solution in order to maintain growth.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)6677-6686
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Dairy Science
Volume95
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2012
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Calf diarrhea
  • Oral electrolyte rehydration solution
  • Strong ion difference

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • Genetics

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'An alkalinizing oral rehydration solution containing lecithin-coated citrus fiber is superior to a nonalkalinizing solution in treating 360 calves with naturally acquired diarrhea'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this