Alternative Cash Transfer Delivery Mechanisms: Impacts on Routine Preventative Health Clinic Visits in Burkina Faso

Richard S Akresh, Damien De Walque, Harounan Kazianga

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

We conducted a unique randomized experiment to estimate the impact of alternative cash transfer delivery mechanisms on household demand for routine preventative health services in rural Burkina Faso. The two-year pilot program randomly distributed cash transfers that were either conditional or unconditional and were given to either mothers or fathers. Families under the conditional cash transfer schemes were required to obtain quarterly child growth monitoring at local health clinics for all children under 60 months old. There were no such requirements under the unconditional programs. Compared with control group households, we find that conditional cash transfers significantly increase the number of preventative health care visits during the previous year, while unconditional cash transfers do not have such an impact. For the conditional cash transfers, transfers given to mothers or fathers showed similar magnitude beneficial impacts on increasing routine visits.
Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationAfrican Successes: Human Capital
EditorsSebastian Edwards, Simon Johnson, David N Weil
PublisherUniversity of Chicago Press
Pages113-135
Volume2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2016

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    Akresh, R. S., Walque, D. D., & Kazianga, H. (2016). Alternative Cash Transfer Delivery Mechanisms: Impacts on Routine Preventative Health Clinic Visits in Burkina Faso. In S. Edwards, S. Johnson, & D. N. Weil (Eds.), African Successes: Human Capital (Vol. 2, pp. 113-135). University of Chicago Press. https://doi.org/10.3386/w17785