Alterations in internal partitioning of carbon in soybean plants in response to nitrogen stress.

T. W. Rufty, C. D. Raper, S. C. Huber

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Alterations in internal partitioning of carbon were evaluated in plants exposed to limited nitrogen supply. Vegetative, nonnodulated soybean plants (Glycine max (L.) Merrill, 'Ransom') were grown for 21 days with 1.0 mM NO3- and then exposed to solutions containing 1.0, 0.1, or 0.0 mM NO3- for a 25-day treatment period. In nitrogen-limited plants, there were decreases in emergence of new leaves and in the expansion rate and final area at full expansion of individual leaves. As indicated by alterations in accumulation of dry weight, a larger proportion of available carbon in the plant was partitioned to the roots with decreased availability of nitrogen. Partitioning of reduced nitrogen to the root also was increased and, in plants devoid of an external supply, considerable redistribution of reduced nitrogen from leaves to the root occurred. The general decrease in growth potential and sink strength for nutrients in leaves of nitrogen-limited plants suggested that factors other than simply availability of nitrogen likely were involved in the restriction of growth in the leaf canopy and the associated increase in carbon allocation to the roots.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)501-508
Number of pages8
JournalCanadian journal of botany. Journal canadien de botanique
Volume62
StatePublished - 1984

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soybean
plant response
partitioning
soybeans
carbon
nitrogen
leaves
biomass allocation
Glycine max
canopy
nutrient
nutrients

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Plant Science

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Alterations in internal partitioning of carbon in soybean plants in response to nitrogen stress. / Rufty, T. W.; Raper, C. D.; Huber, S. C.

In: Canadian journal of botany. Journal canadien de botanique, Vol. 62, 1984, p. 501-508.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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