Alarm pheromone perception in honey bees is decreased by smoke (Hymenoptera: Apidae)

P. Kirk Visscher, Richard S. Vetter, Gene E. Robinson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The application of smoke to honey bee (Apis mellifera) antennae reduced the subsequent electroantennograph response of the antennae to honey bee alarm pheromones, isopentyl acetate, and 2-heptanone. This effect was reversible, and the responsiveness of antennae gradually returned to that of controls within 10-20 min. A similar effect occurred with a floral odor, phenylacetaldehyde, suggesting that smoke interferes with olfaction generally, rather than specifically with honey bee alarm pheromones. A reduction in peripheral sensitivity appears to be one component of the mechanism by which smoke reduces nest defense behavior of honey bees.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Pages11-18
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Insect Behavior
Volume8
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1995

Fingerprint

alarm pheromones
Apidae
honey
smoke
pheromone
bee
honey bees
Hymenoptera
antennae
antenna
defense behavior
2-heptanone
phenylacetaldehyde
olfaction
smell
Apis mellifera
odor
acetate
nest
acetates

Keywords

  • Apis mellifera
  • alarm pheromone
  • electroantennograph
  • honey bee

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Insect Science

Cite this

Alarm pheromone perception in honey bees is decreased by smoke (Hymenoptera : Apidae). / Visscher, P. Kirk; Vetter, Richard S.; Robinson, Gene E.

In: Journal of Insect Behavior, Vol. 8, No. 1, 01.01.1995, p. 11-18.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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