Abstract

Picea engelmannii was studied over its natural elevational range in SE Wyoming. Low photosynthetic rates measured at constant temperature, irradiance and vapor pressure deficit were highly correlated with low minimum (night) air and soil temperature, but at different times during the early summer growth period. Substantial and irreversible reductions in photosynthesis occurred after exposure to night air temperatures of -4 and -5oC that occurred through mid-June. After middle to late June, decreased photosynthetic rates were correlated with low soil temperature. Subfreezing air temperature followed by an extended period of low soil temperature were the primary limitations to photosynthesis in early summer. -from Authors

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)527-533
Number of pages7
JournalCanadian Journal of Forest Research
Volume17
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1987

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soil temperature
Picea
air temperature
photosynthesis
night temperature
summer
Picea engelmannii
vapor pressure
irradiance
temperature
rate
exposure

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Global and Planetary Change
  • Forestry
  • Ecology

Cite this

Air and soil temperature limitations on photosynthesis in Englemann spruce during summer. / Delucia, Evan H; Smith, W. K.

In: Canadian Journal of Forest Research, Vol. 17, No. 6, 01.01.1987, p. 527-533.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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