AIDS literatures

Tim Dean, Steven Ruszczycky

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Queer characters became increasingly visible in literary fiction, taking starring roles in novels by a range of writers, including Carson McCullers, Truman Capote, Angus Wilson, James Baldwin, Christopher Isherwood, Jane Rule, and Maureen Duffy. From the 1950s, a range of fiction and nonfiction books on queer subjects were available as cheap paperbacks. After 1970, gay and lesbian fiction has been constituted as a genre. Queer fiction since Stonewall, in its heterogeneity, has reflected the heterogeneity of queer identities, culture, and politics. The most challenging of 1970s lesbian novels, Bertha Harris's Lover, assembles a fantastical cast of magical women. Over the next two decades American gay male fiction transformed itself from a field of isolated figures to a crowded scene. Queer identities are accommodated in a world more tolerant than that portrayed in radical fiction of the post-Stonewall period.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationThe Cambridge History of Gay and Lesbian Literature
EditorsE. L. McCallum, Mikko Tuhkanen
Place of PublicationCambridge
PublisherCambridge University Press
Pages712-732
Number of pages21
ISBN (Electronic)9781139547376
ISBN (Print)9781107035218
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • lesbian fiction
  • post-Stonewall period
  • American gay male fiction
  • queer radicalism

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Arts and Humanities(all)

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