Agricultural buffers at the rural-urban fringe: An examination of approval by farmers, residents, and academics in the Midwestern United States

William C. Sullivan, Olin M. Anderson, Sarah Taylor Lovell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

In the Midwestern United States, urban areas most often expand by converting farmland into residential sites. This process puts households and working farms in close contact, often resulting in conflicts. Can agricultural buffers, which provide a variety of environmental and aesthetic benefits, help mediate this conflict? This study examined the approval of different buffer types by three stakeholder groups: farmers, residents, and academics. Participants rated three buffer conditions (no buffer, basic buffer, and extensive buffer) for each of six buffer types. Findings reveal support for buffers, with approval of basic buffers over three times that of the no buffer conditions and even greater approval for extensive buffers. Farmers, academics, and residents agreed on their approval for the basic buffers over no buffers, but differed with respect to the extensive buffers. Responses to buffers were nearly equivalent on privately and publicly owned land. The approval for buffers suggests they may provide more than their documented environmental benefits in the agricultural landscape.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)299-313
Number of pages15
JournalLandscape and Urban Planning
Volume69
Issue number2-3
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 15 2004

Keywords

  • Agricultural buffer
  • Land use
  • Landscape aesthetics
  • Rural-urban fringe
  • Sprawl
  • Stakeholder perceptions

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology
  • Nature and Landscape Conservation
  • Management, Monitoring, Policy and Law

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Agricultural buffers at the rural-urban fringe: An examination of approval by farmers, residents, and academics in the Midwestern United States'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this