Agenda setting and the "new" news: Patterns of issue importance among readers of the paper and online versions of the New York Times

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This study examines whether readers of the paper and online versions of a national newspaper acquire different perceptions of the importance of political issues. Using data from a weeklong experiment in which subjects either read the print version of the New York Times, the online version of that paper, or received no special exposure, this study finds evidence that people exposed to the Times for 5 days adjusted their agendas in response to that exposure and that print readers modified their agendas differently than did online readers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)180-207+208+210
JournalCommunication Research
Volume29
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2002

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Language and Linguistics
  • Communication
  • Linguistics and Language

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