Age-related differences in learning incidental environmental information

Kelly E. Caine, Timothy A. Nichols, Arthur D. Fisk, Wendy Rogers

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Incidental environmental information is consistent, potentially beneficial, information that is not necessary for successful task performance (i.e., is seemingly unrelated to the task). In the present study, older and younger participants searched for target letters among distractor letters both of which were laid upon color environments, such that certain color environments predictively correlated with target letter location at varying degrees of consistency. Neither group could express verbal knowledge of the pattern of the environmental information although younger but not older adults showed improved performance in conditions where incidental information cued target location. The findings suggest that younger adults can benefit from incidental environmental information even when they cannot express that it is present in a task but that older adults may need additional cues to benefit from the information.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 49th Annual Meeting, HFES 2005
Pages190-194
Number of pages5
StatePublished - 2005
Externally publishedYes
Event49th Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, HFES 2005 - Orlando, FL, United States
Duration: Sep 26 2005Sep 30 2005

Other

Other49th Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, HFES 2005
CountryUnited States
CityOrlando, FL
Period9/26/059/30/05

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering

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    Caine, K. E., Nichols, T. A., Fisk, A. D., & Rogers, W. (2005). Age-related differences in learning incidental environmental information. In Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 49th Annual Meeting, HFES 2005 (pp. 190-194)