Age differences in credibility judgment of online health information

Q. Vera Liao, Wai Tat Fu

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

To better support older adults' consumption of high quality health information on the Internet, it is important to understand how older adults make credibility judgments with online health information. For this purpose, we conducted two laboratory studies to explore how the credibility cues in message contents, website features, and user reviews could differentially impact younger and older adults' credibility judgments. Results from the first experiment showed that older adults, compared to younger ones, were less sensitive to the credibility cues in message contents, as well as those in the website features. Results from the second experiment showed that user reviews that were consistent with the credibility cues in message contents could reinforce older adults' credibility judgments. Older adults, compared to younger adults, seemed to be less swayed by user reviews that were inconsistent with the message contents. These results provided implications for designing health information websites that better support older adults' credibility judgments.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationIHI'12 - Proceedings of the 2nd ACM SIGHIT International Health Informatics Symposium
Pages353-362
Number of pages10
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 8 2012
Event2nd ACM SIGHIT International Health Informatics Symposium, IHI'12 - Miami, FL, United States
Duration: Jan 28 2012Jan 30 2012

Publication series

NameIHI'12 - Proceedings of the 2nd ACM SIGHIT International Health Informatics Symposium

Other

Other2nd ACM SIGHIT International Health Informatics Symposium, IHI'12
CountryUnited States
CityMiami, FL
Period1/28/121/30/12

Keywords

  • Aging
  • Online health information
  • User review
  • Web credibility

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Informatics
  • Health Information Management

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