Adsorption of cellular proteins to polyelectrolyte-functionalized gold nanorods: A mechanism for nanoparticle regulation of cell phenotype?

Patrick N. Sisco, Christopher G. Wilson, Davin Chernak, Jessica C. Clark, Elissa M. Grzincic, Kayla Ako-Asare, Edie C. Goldsmith, Catherine J. Murphy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Cell behavior in the presence of nanomaterials is typically explored through simple viability assays, but there is mounting evidence that nanomaterials can have more subtle effects on a variety of cellular functions. Previously our lab demonstrated that gold nanorods functionalized with polyelectrolyte multi-layers inhibited rat cardiac fibroblast-mediated remodeling of type I collagen scaffolds by altering fibroblast phenotype and the mechanical properties of the collagen network. In this work, we examine a possible mechanism for these effects: adsorption of cellular proteins by the nanorods. Mass spectrometric and gel electrophoresis of media collected from cultured cells suggests that a number of proteins, some of which mediate cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions, adsorb onto the surface of these nanoparticles in vitro. Polyethylene glycol coating of the nanorods largely mitigates protein adsorption and fibroblast-mediated collagen remodeling. These results suggest that adsorption of proteins by nanorods could have a significant effect on cell functions, including fibroblast-mediated matrix remodeling.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere86670
JournalPloS one
Volume9
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 6 2014

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • General

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