Actor–partner interdependence of humility and relationship quality among couples transitioning to parenthood

Chelsea A. Reid, Everett L. Worthington, Rachel C. Garthe, Don E. Davis, Joshua N. Hook, Daryl R. Van Tongeren, Brandon J. Griffin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The transition to parenthood is a challenging experience that often strains relationships, but perceiving one’s partner as humble (actor relational humility) and being perceived by one’s partner as humble (partner relational humility) were hypothesized to benefit couples during this transition. Married couples (N = 69) were tracked from the third trimester of pregnancy through 21 months postpartum. Husbands and wives provided ratings of relational humility and dyadic adjustment. Actor–partner interdependence models tested actor and partner effects of relational humility on dyadic adjustment across the transition. Although couples declined in dyadic adjustment over the transition at the same rate regardless of relational humility (counter to Hypothesis 2), those higher in relational humility reported greater dyadic adjustment at each time point during the transition (consistent with Hypothesis 1). These findings support the benefits of relational humility to relationship quality, and we call for further research into humility’s benefits during times of relationship transition.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)122-132
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Positive Psychology
Volume13
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 4 2018
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Humility
  • dyadic adjustment
  • relationships
  • transition to parenthood

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)

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