Accepting our weaknesses and enjoying better relationships: An initial examination of self-security

Alice B. Huang, Howard Berenbaum

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The present research introduces self-security, a new indicator of healthy self-evaluation. Self-security is defined as the open and nonjudgmental acceptance of one's own weaknesses. To assess self-security, we developed the Security of “I” Assessment (SofIA), a self-report questionnaire. Study 1′s (N = 195) exploratory factor analysis suggested a single-factor model that Study 2′s (N = 158) confirmatory factor analysis supported as providing good fit to the data. In Study 3 (N = 195), the SofIA demonstrated excellent test-retest reliability. Using the SofIA, Study 1 also explored self-security's correlates in a sample of 195 undergraduates, with 279 of their close others (family, long-term friends, and romantic partners) reporting on the quality of their relationships with the participants. Self-security was significantly associated, but not redundant with, other aspects of self-evaluation (e.g., self-esteem, self-compassion). Self-security was also associated with self-evaluative interpersonal traits and attachment style. Importantly, even after simultaneously accounting for other aspects of self-evaluation, self-security predicted relationship quality, as independently reported by the participants and their close others. Specifically, participants’ greater self-security significantly predicted their experiencing less conflict and emotional distress and their close others’ reporting more support received from the participants.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)64-70
Number of pages7
JournalPersonality and Individual Differences
Volume106
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2017

Fingerprint

Diagnostic Self Evaluation
Statistical Factor Analysis
Self Concept
Reproducibility of Results
Self Report
Research

Keywords

  • Acceptance
  • Attachment
  • Close relationships
  • Relationship quality
  • Self-evaluation
  • Self-security

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Accepting our weaknesses and enjoying better relationships : An initial examination of self-security. / Huang, Alice B.; Berenbaum, Howard.

In: Personality and Individual Differences, Vol. 106, 01.02.2017, p. 64-70.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{94ea059e8bc74f9d93357c581983a965,
title = "Accepting our weaknesses and enjoying better relationships: An initial examination of self-security",
abstract = "The present research introduces self-security, a new indicator of healthy self-evaluation. Self-security is defined as the open and nonjudgmental acceptance of one's own weaknesses. To assess self-security, we developed the Security of “I” Assessment (SofIA), a self-report questionnaire. Study 1′s (N = 195) exploratory factor analysis suggested a single-factor model that Study 2′s (N = 158) confirmatory factor analysis supported as providing good fit to the data. In Study 3 (N = 195), the SofIA demonstrated excellent test-retest reliability. Using the SofIA, Study 1 also explored self-security's correlates in a sample of 195 undergraduates, with 279 of their close others (family, long-term friends, and romantic partners) reporting on the quality of their relationships with the participants. Self-security was significantly associated, but not redundant with, other aspects of self-evaluation (e.g., self-esteem, self-compassion). Self-security was also associated with self-evaluative interpersonal traits and attachment style. Importantly, even after simultaneously accounting for other aspects of self-evaluation, self-security predicted relationship quality, as independently reported by the participants and their close others. Specifically, participants’ greater self-security significantly predicted their experiencing less conflict and emotional distress and their close others’ reporting more support received from the participants.",
keywords = "Acceptance, Attachment, Close relationships, Relationship quality, Self-evaluation, Self-security",
author = "Huang, {Alice B.} and Howard Berenbaum",
year = "2017",
month = "2",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.paid.2016.10.031",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "106",
pages = "64--70",
journal = "Personality and Individual Differences",
issn = "0191-8869",
publisher = "Elsevier BV",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Accepting our weaknesses and enjoying better relationships

T2 - An initial examination of self-security

AU - Huang, Alice B.

AU - Berenbaum, Howard

PY - 2017/2/1

Y1 - 2017/2/1

N2 - The present research introduces self-security, a new indicator of healthy self-evaluation. Self-security is defined as the open and nonjudgmental acceptance of one's own weaknesses. To assess self-security, we developed the Security of “I” Assessment (SofIA), a self-report questionnaire. Study 1′s (N = 195) exploratory factor analysis suggested a single-factor model that Study 2′s (N = 158) confirmatory factor analysis supported as providing good fit to the data. In Study 3 (N = 195), the SofIA demonstrated excellent test-retest reliability. Using the SofIA, Study 1 also explored self-security's correlates in a sample of 195 undergraduates, with 279 of their close others (family, long-term friends, and romantic partners) reporting on the quality of their relationships with the participants. Self-security was significantly associated, but not redundant with, other aspects of self-evaluation (e.g., self-esteem, self-compassion). Self-security was also associated with self-evaluative interpersonal traits and attachment style. Importantly, even after simultaneously accounting for other aspects of self-evaluation, self-security predicted relationship quality, as independently reported by the participants and their close others. Specifically, participants’ greater self-security significantly predicted their experiencing less conflict and emotional distress and their close others’ reporting more support received from the participants.

AB - The present research introduces self-security, a new indicator of healthy self-evaluation. Self-security is defined as the open and nonjudgmental acceptance of one's own weaknesses. To assess self-security, we developed the Security of “I” Assessment (SofIA), a self-report questionnaire. Study 1′s (N = 195) exploratory factor analysis suggested a single-factor model that Study 2′s (N = 158) confirmatory factor analysis supported as providing good fit to the data. In Study 3 (N = 195), the SofIA demonstrated excellent test-retest reliability. Using the SofIA, Study 1 also explored self-security's correlates in a sample of 195 undergraduates, with 279 of their close others (family, long-term friends, and romantic partners) reporting on the quality of their relationships with the participants. Self-security was significantly associated, but not redundant with, other aspects of self-evaluation (e.g., self-esteem, self-compassion). Self-security was also associated with self-evaluative interpersonal traits and attachment style. Importantly, even after simultaneously accounting for other aspects of self-evaluation, self-security predicted relationship quality, as independently reported by the participants and their close others. Specifically, participants’ greater self-security significantly predicted their experiencing less conflict and emotional distress and their close others’ reporting more support received from the participants.

KW - Acceptance

KW - Attachment

KW - Close relationships

KW - Relationship quality

KW - Self-evaluation

KW - Self-security

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84992500251&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84992500251&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.paid.2016.10.031

DO - 10.1016/j.paid.2016.10.031

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:84992500251

VL - 106

SP - 64

EP - 70

JO - Personality and Individual Differences

JF - Personality and Individual Differences

SN - 0191-8869

ER -