Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Benchmarks for Nutrition in Child Care 2011: Are Child-Care Providers across Contexts Meeting Recommendations?

Dipti A. Dev, Brent A. McBride, Kristen Harrison, Kelly Bost, Brent McBride, Sharon Donovan, Diana Grigsby-Toussaint, Janet Liechty, Angela Wiley, Margarita Teran-Garcia, Barbara Fiese

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (Academy) recommends feeding practices for child-care providers to establish nutrition habits in early childhood to prevent obesity. With >12 million US children in child care, little is known about child-care providers' feeding practices. The purpose of this study was to examine child-care providers' feeding practices to assess whether providers met the Academy's benchmarks and whether attainment of benchmarks varied across child-care contexts (Head Start, Child and Adult Care Food Program [CACFP], and non-CACFP). Cross-sectional data was collected in 2011 and 2012 from 118 child-care providers who completed self-administered surveys regarding their feeding practices for 2- to 5-year-old children. χ2 tests and analysis of variance were used to determine variation across contexts. Head Start providers sat more frequently with children during meals (P=0.01), ate the same foods as children (P=0.001), and served meals family style (P<0.0001) more often compared with CACFP and non-CACFP providers. Head Start providers (P=0.002), parents (P=0.001), and children (P=0.01) received more nutrition-education opportunities compared with CACFP and non-CACFP. Head Start providers encouraged more balance and variety of foods (P<0.05), offered healthier foods (P<0.05), modeled healthy eating (P<0.001), and taught children about nutrition (P<0.001) compared with CACFP and non-CACFP providers. Providers across all three contexts used significantly more non-internal than internal mealtime verbal comments (P<0.0001). Head Start providers had greater compliance with the Academy's benchmarks compared with CACFP and non-CACFP providers. Possible reasons for this compliance might be attributed to Head Start nutrition performance standards and increased nutrition-training opportunities for Head Start staff. Head Start programs can serve as a model in implementing the Academy's benchmarks.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1346-1353
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics
Volume113
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2013

Fingerprint

Head Start
child care
Benchmarking
Dietetics
Child and Adult Care Food Program
dietetics
Child Care
food and nutrition programs
nutrition
Food
meals (menu)
compliance
Meals
child nutrition
healthy diet
nutrition education
childhood
foods
obesity
analysis of variance

Keywords

  • Child and Adult Care Food Program
  • Child-care nutrition policies
  • Child-care providers
  • Feeding practices
  • Head Start Program

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

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title = "Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Benchmarks for Nutrition in Child Care 2011: Are Child-Care Providers across Contexts Meeting Recommendations?",
abstract = "The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (Academy) recommends feeding practices for child-care providers to establish nutrition habits in early childhood to prevent obesity. With >12 million US children in child care, little is known about child-care providers' feeding practices. The purpose of this study was to examine child-care providers' feeding practices to assess whether providers met the Academy's benchmarks and whether attainment of benchmarks varied across child-care contexts (Head Start, Child and Adult Care Food Program [CACFP], and non-CACFP). Cross-sectional data was collected in 2011 and 2012 from 118 child-care providers who completed self-administered surveys regarding their feeding practices for 2- to 5-year-old children. χ2 tests and analysis of variance were used to determine variation across contexts. Head Start providers sat more frequently with children during meals (P=0.01), ate the same foods as children (P=0.001), and served meals family style (P<0.0001) more often compared with CACFP and non-CACFP providers. Head Start providers (P=0.002), parents (P=0.001), and children (P=0.01) received more nutrition-education opportunities compared with CACFP and non-CACFP. Head Start providers encouraged more balance and variety of foods (P<0.05), offered healthier foods (P<0.05), modeled healthy eating (P<0.001), and taught children about nutrition (P<0.001) compared with CACFP and non-CACFP providers. Providers across all three contexts used significantly more non-internal than internal mealtime verbal comments (P<0.0001). Head Start providers had greater compliance with the Academy's benchmarks compared with CACFP and non-CACFP providers. Possible reasons for this compliance might be attributed to Head Start nutrition performance standards and increased nutrition-training opportunities for Head Start staff. Head Start programs can serve as a model in implementing the Academy's benchmarks.",
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author = "Dev, {Dipti A.} and McBride, {Brent A.} and Kristen Harrison and Kelly Bost and Brent McBride and Sharon Donovan and Diana Grigsby-Toussaint and Janet Liechty and Angela Wiley and Margarita Teran-Garcia and Barbara Fiese",
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AU - McBride, Brent A.

AU - Harrison, Kristen

AU - Bost, Kelly

AU - McBride, Brent

AU - Donovan, Sharon

AU - Grigsby-Toussaint, Diana

AU - Liechty, Janet

AU - Wiley, Angela

AU - Teran-Garcia, Margarita

AU - Fiese, Barbara

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