Abusive supervision in advising relationships: Investigating the role of social support

Elizabeth V. Hobman, Simon Lloyd D Restubog, Prashant Bordia, Robert L. Tang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The present study examines the consequences of abusive supervision in an educational setting. The study contrasts the cross-domain stress-buffering hypothesis with the within-domain stress exacerbation hypothesis in examining the moderating role of advisor and team member support on the relationship between abusive supervision and student outcomes in student-advisor relationships. Using a temporal research design, results provided support for both hypotheses. In support of the stress exacerbation hypothesis, in the presence of high advisor support, there was a significant positive relationship between abusive supervision and anxiety, and a significant negative association between abusive supervision and psychological well-being. Consistent with the stress-buffering hypothesis, in the presence of high team member support, there was a negligible association between abusive supervision and satisfaction and anxiety.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)233-256
Number of pages24
JournalApplied Psychology
Volume58
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2009
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Applied Psychology

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