A Trait-state-error model of adult hassles over two years: Magnitude, sources, and predictors of stress continuity

Nicholas A. Hazel, Benjamin L. Hankin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

There are stable individual differences in exposure to stressful circumstances over time. The current study employed a latent trait-state model to estimate the magnitude of that stability and its sources. Adults (N = 327; age M = 43.9 years, SD = 6.15) provided reports of hassles and depressive symptoms every three months for two years. A Trait-State-Error model suggested that 60% of the variance in self-reports of hassles was attributable to stable, between-persons factors. Of the remaining variance, 20% was attributable to an autoregressive factor and 20% was attributable to either unique state factors or error. Moreover, average depressive symptoms, family income, and family conflict reported at baseline were significant predictors of the stable trait factor. These findings suggest that adults' self-reports of stressful experiences show marked stability over time, and that this stability may have significant implications for understanding the occurrence and impact of stress.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)103-123
Number of pages21
JournalJournal of Social and Clinical Psychology
Volume33
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2014
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Clinical Psychology

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