A smoothed particle hydrodynamics model for miscible flow in three-dimensional fractures and the two-dimensional Rayleigh-Taylor instability

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

A numerical model based on smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) has been developed and used to simulate the classical two-dimensional Rayleigh-Taylor instability and three-dimensional miscible flow in fracture apertures with complex geometries. To model miscible flow fluid particles with variable, composition dependent, masses were used. By basing the SPH equations on the particle number density artificial surface tension effects were avoided. The simulation results for the growth of a single perturbation driven by the Rayleigh-Taylor instability compare well with numerical results obtained by Fournier et al., and the growth of a perturbation with time can be represented quite well by a second-degree polynomial, in accord with the linear stability analysis of Duff et al. The dispersion coefficient found from SPH simulation of flow and diffusion in an ideal fracture was in excellent agreement with the value predicted by the theory of Taylor and Aris. The simulations of miscible flow in fracture apertures can be used to determination dispersion coefficients for transport in fractured media - a parameter used in large-scale simulations of contaminant transport.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)610-624
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Computational Physics
Volume207
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 10 2005
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Flow and transport in fractures
  • Miscible flow
  • Rayleigh-Taylor instability
  • Smoothed particle hydrodynamics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Numerical Analysis
  • Modeling and Simulation
  • Physics and Astronomy (miscellaneous)
  • Physics and Astronomy(all)
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Computational Mathematics
  • Applied Mathematics

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