A scoping review of the involvement of children’s communication partners in aided augmentative and alternative communication modeling interventions

Elizabeth E. Biggs, Erik W. Carter, Carly B. Gilson

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Abstract

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to inform practice and research by identifying and synthesizing research on interventions in which natural communication partners implemented aided augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) modeling strategies. Method: A scoping review yielded 29 studies. Data were charted related to participant characteristics, intervention characteristics, partner instruction and assessment, and partner perspectives of social validity. Results: More than 157 peer and 100 adult communication partners (e.g., parents, special educators, paraprofessionals) implemented aided AAC modeling strategies within included studies. To teach communication partners intervention strategies, researchers frequently reported using (a) oral instruction, (b) modeling, and (c) practice or application opportunities with performance feedback. Partner instruction frequently involved both training and concurrent support (e.g., coaching, facilitation, consultation, follow-up support). Conclusion: Findings from this review inform the design and delivery of aided AAC modeling interventions by children’s natural communication partners. Findings also highlight important avenues for enhancing the rigor of future research on interventions involving aided AAC modeling, including the quality of reporting and application of principles from implementation science.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)743-758
Number of pages16
JournalAmerican journal of speech-language pathology
Volume28
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2019

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Linguistics and Language
  • Speech and Hearing

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