A review of the effects of catch-and-release angling on black bass, Micropterus spp. Implications for conservation and management of populations

Mike J. Siepker, K. G. Ostrand, S. J. Cooke, D. P. Philipp, D. H. Wahl

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

This paper summarises recent peer-reviewed literature addressing the effects of catch-and-release angling on black bass, Micropterus spp., to facilitate management and conservation of these fish. Traditionally, the effects of catch and release have been evaluated by measuring mortality. Many recent studies have measured sublethal effects on physiology and behaviour. There is also greater emphasis on adding more realism to sublethal catch-and-release experiments through angler involvement in research activities and by conducting studies in the field rather than in laboratory environments. Owing to these advances, there have been a number of recent findings, which are summarised here, related to air exposure, gear (e.g. circle hooks) and the weigh-in procedure that are particularly relevant to black bass anglers, tournament organisers and fishery managers. Additional research is particularly needed for: (1) population-level effects of angling for nesting fish; (2) population-level effects of tournament-associated mortality; (3) effectiveness of livewell additives for enhancing survival; (4) consequences of fish displacement in competitive events; (5) effects of weigh-in procedures and other organisational issues on fish condition and survival; and (6) reducing barotrauma.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)91-101
Number of pages11
JournalFisheries Management and Ecology
Volume14
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2007

Keywords

  • Angling
  • Catch and release
  • Largemouth bass
  • Smallmouth bass
  • Sublethal stress

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Aquatic Science
  • Ecology

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