A Pilot Study to Evaluate the Impact of the HIV Infant Tracking System (HITSystem 2.0) on Priority Prevention of Mother-to-Child Transmission (PMTCT) Outcomes

Sarah Finocchario-Kessler, Melinda Brown, May Maloba, Niaman Nazir, Catherine Wexler, Kathy Goggin, Jacinda K. Dariotis, Natabhona Mabachi, Silas Lagat, Sharon Koech, Brad Gautney

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

We assessed the preliminary impact of the adapted HIV Infant Tracking System (HITSystem v2.0) intervention on prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) outcomes using a matched cluster randomized design in two Kenyan government hospitals. Between November 2017 and June 2019, n = 157 pregnant women with HIV were enrolled and followed from their first PMTCT appointment until 12-weeks postpartum. Data from 135 women were analyzed (HITSystem 2.0: n = 53, standard of care (SOC): n = 82), excluding eight deaths, eight pregnancy losses, and six transfers/moves. The primary outcome, complete PMTCT retention, is an aggregate measure of attendance at all scheduled antenatal appointments, hospital-based delivery, and infant HIV-testing before 7-weeks postnatal. HITSystem 2.0 participants were more likely to receive complete PMTCT services compared to SOC (56.6% vs. 17.1% p < 0.001). In multivariate modeling, HITSystem 2.0 was the strongest predictor of complete PMTCT retention (aOR 5.7, [1.2–90.8], p = 0.032). SOC participants had 1.91 increased hazard rate of PMTCT disengagement; (aHR 6.8, [2.2–21.1]; p < 0.001).

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAIDS and Behavior
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2021

Keywords

  • Appointment attendance
  • ART adherence
  • Complete PMTCT retention
  • EHealth
  • Facility deliveries
  • HIV
  • Kenya
  • MHealth
  • PMTCT
  • Pregnancy
  • Retention
  • Women

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Infectious Diseases

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