A pilot study of Chicago waterways as reservoirs of multidrug-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (MDR-ENT) in a high-risk region for community-acquired MDR-ENT infection in children

Latania K. Logan, Liqing Zhang, Stefan J. Green, Samuel Dorevitch, Gustavo A. Arango-Argoty, Kendrick Reme, Emily Garner, Jared Aldstadt, Yvette J. Johnson-Walker, Mary K. Hayden, Robert A. Weinstein, Amy Pruden

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Community-acquired multidrug resistant Enterobacteriaceae (MDR-Ent) infections continue to increase in the United States. In prior studies, we identified neighboring regions in Chicago, Illinois, where children have 5 to 6 times greater odds of MDR-Ent infections. To prevent community spread of MDR-Ent, we need to identify the MDR-Ent reservoirs. A pilot study of 4 Chicago waterways for MDR-Ent and associated antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) was conducted. Three waterways (A1 to A3) are labeled safe for “incidental contact recreation” (e.g., kayaking), and A4 is a nonrecreational waterway that carries nondisinfected water. Surface water samples were collected and processed for standard bacterial culture and shotgun metagenomic sequencing. Generally, A3 and A4 (neighboring waterways which are not hydraulically connected) were strikingly similar in bacterial taxa, ARG profiles, and abundances of corresponding clades and genera within the Enterobacteriaceae. Additionally, total ARG abundances recovered from the full microbial community were strongly correlated between A3 and A4 (R2 = 0.97). Escherichia coli numbers (per 100 ml water) were highest in A4 (783 most probable number [MPN]) and A3 (200 MPN) relative to A2 (84 MPN) and A1 (32 MPN). We found concerning ARGs in Enterobacteriaceae such as MCR-1 (colistin), Qnr and OqxA/B (quinolones), CTX-M, OXA and ACT/MIR (beta-lactams), and AAC (aminoglycosides). We found significant correlations in microbial community composition between nearby waterways that are not hydraulically connected, suggesting cross-seeding and the potential for mobility of ARGs. Enterobacteriaceae and ARG profiles support the hypothesized concerns that recreational waterways are a potential source of community-acquired MDR-Ent.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere02310-19
JournalAntimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy
Volume64
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2020

Keywords

  • Beta-lactamases
  • Community-acquired infections
  • Drug resistance mechanisms
  • Enterobacteriaceae
  • Molecular epidemiology
  • Multidrug resistance
  • Pediatric infectious disease
  • Wastewater treatment
  • Water quality
  • Waterborne pathogens

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology
  • Pharmacology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

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