A pilot feasibility randomized controlled trial adding behavioral counseling to supervised physical activity in prostate cancer survivors: behavior change in prostate cancer survivors trial (BOOST)

Linda Trinh, Arthur F Kramer, Kendrith Rowland, Dominick A Strom, Jaime N Wong, Edward McAuley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of delivering a supervised physical activity program plus standard exercise counseling (PA + EC) versus a supervised physical activity plus motivationally-enhanced behavioral counseling (PA + BC) in prostate cancer survivors. Secondary outcomes included objectively assessed PA, quality of life, body composition, cardiorespiratory fitness, cognitive functioning, and physical function. Twenty-six prostate cancer survivors were randomized to a 12-week supervised PA program plus standard exercise counseling or a 12-week supervised PA plus behavioral counseling based on the Multi-Process Action Control framework. Feasibility was determined through enrolment rate, measurement completion rate, loss-to-follow-up, adherence to the intervention, adverse events, and program evaluation items assessing burden and satisfaction. Of the 26 prostate cancer survivors enrolled (Mage = 65.6 ± 6.8), 96% completed the intervention. Measurement completion rates for the study measures were 88.5%. Adherence to the supervised PA sessions was 92% (completed 11/12 supervised PA sessions) and 100% (completed 12/12 supervised PA sessions) in the PA + EC and PA + BC group, respectively. Adherence to the home-based PA sessions was 70% (completed 7/10 home-based sessions) and 90% (completed 9/10 home-based sessions) in the PA + EC and PA + BC group, respectively. Overall, prostate cancer survivors were highly satisfied with the intervention components and found it rewarding, useful for research helping others, and useful for them personally. The patterns in the secondary outcomes were consistent with a positive impact of the intervention, favoring the PA + BC group. Preliminary evidence suggests that adding behavioral counseling to supervised PA in prostate cancer survivors may be feasible and result in better adherence to PA compared to exercise counseling alone, although additional refinement is needed. A combination of supervised and home-based PA may be feasible for behavior change in the self-management of prostate cancer. The study is registered with http://ClinicalTrials.gov (ID NCT03191968).

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Behavioral Medicine
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Sep 26 2020

Keywords

  • Behavior change
  • Physical activity
  • Cognitive function
  • Multi-process action control framework
  • Prostate cancer survivors

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