A pediatric screening instrument to detect problematic infant-parent interactions: Initial reliability and validity in a sample of high- and low-risk infants

Barbara H. Fiese, Julie Poehlmann, Martin Irwin, Michael Gordon, Ellen Curry-Bleggi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to determine the initial reliability and validity of a screening instrument developed to detect problematic interactions between infants and parents as part of a pediatric well-baby exam. Participants included 117 infant-mother dyads (57 preterms and 60 full terms) assessed when infants were 6 to 9 months old. Mothers and infants were observed playing an interactional game such as peek-a-boo during the course of the pediatric exam. The game was scored for degree of interactional reciprocity using the Pediatric Infant Parent Exam (PIPE). Acceptable levels of interrater reliability were achieved. As predicted, higher risk infants and their mothers exhibited more problematic interactions than lower risk infants and their mothers. Results indicated that the PIPE was a reliable means of screening for interactional difficulties, that was sensitive to, but not synonymous with, neonatal health indices.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)463-478
Number of pages16
JournalInfant Mental Health Journal
Volume22
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2001
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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