A national study of community living: Impact of type of residence and hours of in-home support

Rah Kyung Kim, Stacy K. Dymond

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This study investigated the frequency of community participation and level of assistance needed to perform domestic and safety skills for individuals with severe disabilities who live successfully in the community, based on type of residence and hours of in-home support provided. Participants included residential specialists from small community residences (i.e., eight or less residents) in 26 states who had experience delivering residential services to adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities. Surveys were mailed to 1,000 residential specialists using a random proportional stratified sampling procedure; 280 completed surveys were used for data analysis. Residential specialists who work at supported apartments indicated that individuals with severe disabilities needed less assistance performing domestic and safety skills and participated more frequently in community activities than residential specialists who worked at group homes. Residential specialists who provided less than 20 hours of in-home support per week also indicated individuals with severe disabilities needed less assistance performing domestic and safety skills and participated more frequently in community activities than residential specialists who provided 20 hours or more of in-home support. The findings suggest that the philosophy of supported living has not been fully realized. Flexible systems must be developed for individuals with severe disabilities that respond to their changing needs and preferences.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)116-129
Number of pages14
JournalResearch and Practice for Persons with Severe Disabilities
Volume37
Issue number2
StatePublished - Jun 1 2012

Keywords

  • Community activities
  • Domestic skills
  • Group homes
  • Safety skills
  • Severe disabilities
  • Supported apartments
  • Supported living

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health Professions(all)

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