A low complexity coordination architecture for networked supervisory medical systems

Po Liang Wu, Woochul Kang, Abdullah Al-Nayeem, Lui Raymond Sha, Richard B Berlin, Julian M. Goldman

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Cooperating medical devices, envisioned by Integrated Clinical Environment (ICE) of Medical Device Plug-and-Play (MDPnP), is expected to improve the safety and the quality of patient care. To ensure safety, the cooperating medical devices must be thoroughly verified and tested. However, concurrent control of devices without proper coordination poses a significant challenge for the verification of the safety, since complex interaction patterns between devices might cause the explosion of the verification state space. In this paper, we propose a low-complexity coordination architecture and protocol for networked supervisory medical systems. The proposed architecture organizes the systems in a hierarchical and organ-based manner in accordance to human physiology and home-ostasis. Further, the proposed protocol avoids potential conflicts and unsafe controls, while allowing efficient concurrent operations of medical devices. The evaluation results show that our approach reduce the complexity by several orders of magnitude.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of the ACM/IEEE 4th International Conference on Cyber-Physical Systems, ICCPS 2013
Pages89-98
Number of pages10
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2 2013
Event4th ACM/IEEE International Conference on Cyber-Physical Systems, ICCPS 2013 - Philadelphia, PA, United States
Duration: Apr 8 2013Apr 11 2013

Publication series

NameProceedings of the ACM/IEEE 4th International Conference on Cyber-Physical Systems, ICCPS 2013

Other

Other4th ACM/IEEE International Conference on Cyber-Physical Systems, ICCPS 2013
Country/TerritoryUnited States
CityPhiladelphia, PA
Period4/8/134/11/13

Keywords

  • Architectural patterns
  • Complexity reduction
  • Coordination
  • Networked supervisory medical systems

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Networks and Communications

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