A hybrid MoM/FDTD technique for studying human head/antenna interactions

E. A. Forgy, W. C. Chew, J. M. Jin

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

As advances in numerical methods for solutions to Maxwell's equations accelerate, larger and more complex electromagnetic problems are becoming tractable at an astounding rate. The science of computational electromagnetics (CEM) gains inertia with each passing day. The maturing field of CEM research has sprouted various branches of research. The finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method, introduced in 1966 by Yee (1966), and pioneered by Taflove (1995), among others, since 1975, provides a simple and robust method for simulating the propagation of electromagnetic radiation through complex media, e.g., human tissue. Although the FDTD method performs superbly for such propagation simulations, it is not very well suited for modeling complex metallic structures, e.g., antennas. Conversely, a distinct branch of CEM research, the method of moments (MoM), is superior for modeling complex metallic structures and is not very well suited for propagation through complex media, such as human tissue. In this paper, a hybrid MoM/FDTD method for simulating the interaction of antennas with the human head is presented.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication1998 IEEE-APS Conference on Antennas and Propagation for Wireless Communications, APWC 1998
PublisherInstitute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.
Pages81-84
Number of pages4
ISBN (Electronic)0780349555, 9780780349551
DOIs
StatePublished - 1998
Event1998 IEEE-APS Conference on Antennas and Propagation for Wireless Communications, APWC 1998 - Waltham, United States
Duration: Nov 1 1998Nov 4 1998

Publication series

Name1998 IEEE-APS Conference on Antennas and Propagation for Wireless Communications, APWC 1998
Volume1998-November

Conference

Conference1998 IEEE-APS Conference on Antennas and Propagation for Wireless Communications, APWC 1998
CountryUnited States
CityWaltham
Period11/1/9811/4/98

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Networks and Communications
  • Instrumentation

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