A holistic workflow development for agricultural supply chain analysis: Integration of meteorological forecasting, crop simulation, and supply chain optimization models

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Agricultural supply chains are complex systems that consist of four major subsystems: production, processing and manufacturing, distribution, and utilization. The agricultural production subsystem is spatio-temporally explicit and is sensitive to changes in climate and weather patterns. It is not only dependent on local-scale environmental factors such as weather and soil properties, but also affected by farm management and infrastructure capabilities. Fluctuations in agricultural productivity impose significant challenges on the design and operations of integrated supply chain systems that couple productivity with farm management decisions within the context of large-scale supply chains. As a result, a key challenge for supply chain modeling is predicting agricultural production across space and time in order to provide better management decisions at each stage-from growth through processing to distribution of goods. Systems analysis is critical to understand the interactions among subsystems and to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of the whole system. Given increased attentions on how to utilize agricultural resources to improve energy securities, this study aims to develop a holistic approach to provide decision support on biofuel supply chain development considering the changes of weather and crop production. Many computational tools have been developed to simulate independent subsystems of agricultural production. However, our key questions require understanding of the coupled systems. Our research aims to establish a coherent, extensible scientific workflow that enables new scientific discovery by linking domain-specific computer models of complex systems into a hierarchical meta-model of the interacting physical, biological, and engineering systems. To address these questions we are developing an integrated workflow to evaluate the interactions among climate change, crop production, and supply chain systems. The workflow consists of three major modeling tools, weather research and forecasting (WRF) modeling, BioCro crop simulation modeling, and BioScope supply chain optimization (Figure 1).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationASABE 1st Climate Change Symposium
Subtitle of host publicationAdaptation and Mitigation
PublisherAmerican Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers
Pages157-159
Number of pages3
ISBN (Electronic)9781510806610
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015
EventASABE 1st Climate Change Symposium: Adaptation and Mitigation - Chicago, United States
Duration: May 3 2015May 5 2015

Publication series

NameASABE 1st Climate Change Symposium: Adaptation and Mitigation

Other

OtherASABE 1st Climate Change Symposium: Adaptation and Mitigation
CountryUnited States
CityChicago
Period5/3/155/5/15

Fingerprint

agricultural production
weather
crop
crop production
modeling
simulation
farm
productivity
holistic approach
systems analysis
biofuel
soil property
environmental factor
manufacturing
infrastructure
engineering
climate change
analysis
meteorological forecasting
climate

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Atmospheric Science
  • Global and Planetary Change

Cite this

Lin, T., LeBauer, D., Rodriguez, L., & Wang, S. (2015). A holistic workflow development for agricultural supply chain analysis: Integration of meteorological forecasting, crop simulation, and supply chain optimization models. In ASABE 1st Climate Change Symposium: Adaptation and Mitigation (pp. 157-159). (ASABE 1st Climate Change Symposium: Adaptation and Mitigation). American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers.

A holistic workflow development for agricultural supply chain analysis : Integration of meteorological forecasting, crop simulation, and supply chain optimization models. / Lin, Tao; LeBauer, David; Rodriguez, Luis; Wang, Shaowen.

ASABE 1st Climate Change Symposium: Adaptation and Mitigation. American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers, 2015. p. 157-159 (ASABE 1st Climate Change Symposium: Adaptation and Mitigation).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Lin, T, LeBauer, D, Rodriguez, L & Wang, S 2015, A holistic workflow development for agricultural supply chain analysis: Integration of meteorological forecasting, crop simulation, and supply chain optimization models. in ASABE 1st Climate Change Symposium: Adaptation and Mitigation. ASABE 1st Climate Change Symposium: Adaptation and Mitigation, American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers, pp. 157-159, ASABE 1st Climate Change Symposium: Adaptation and Mitigation, Chicago, United States, 5/3/15.
Lin T, LeBauer D, Rodriguez L, Wang S. A holistic workflow development for agricultural supply chain analysis: Integration of meteorological forecasting, crop simulation, and supply chain optimization models. In ASABE 1st Climate Change Symposium: Adaptation and Mitigation. American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers. 2015. p. 157-159. (ASABE 1st Climate Change Symposium: Adaptation and Mitigation).
Lin, Tao ; LeBauer, David ; Rodriguez, Luis ; Wang, Shaowen. / A holistic workflow development for agricultural supply chain analysis : Integration of meteorological forecasting, crop simulation, and supply chain optimization models. ASABE 1st Climate Change Symposium: Adaptation and Mitigation. American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers, 2015. pp. 157-159 (ASABE 1st Climate Change Symposium: Adaptation and Mitigation).
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