A hierarchical investigation of personality and behavior: Examining Neo-Socioanalytic models of health-related outcomes

Tim Bogg, Michelle W. Voss, Dustin Wood, Brent W. Roberts

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Based on proposed hierarchical relations derived from the Neo-Socioanalytic Theory of personality [Roberts, B. W., & Wood, D. (2006). Personality development in the context of the Neo-Socioanalytic Model of personality. In D. K. Mroczek & T. D. Little (Eds.), Handbook of personality development (pp. 11-39). Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates Publishers], the present study examined the relationships between trait and motivation constructs and health-related outcomes. Participants (N = 201) completed a Big Five measure of personality traits, parallel exercise and diet behavioral identity trait measures, measures of personal values, exercise and diet-related personal strivings, and exercise and diet self-reports. Participants also completed a physical activity assessment and were weighed on a calibrated electronic scale from which body fat percentage could be determined. It was expected that contextualized trait and motivation constructs would mediate the relations between broad trait and motivation constructs and the health-related outcomes. The patterns of relations across trait and motivation constructs also were explored. The trait domain exhibited the expected pattern of hierarchical relations, but the motivation domain showed a more complex pattern of relations. The results are discussed in relation to a hierarchical model of personality and behavior that brings together trait and motivation constructs at multiple levels of analysis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)183-207
Number of pages25
JournalJournal of Research in Personality
Volume42
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2008

Keywords

  • Diet
  • Exercise
  • Hierarchical
  • Identity
  • Personality

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Psychology(all)

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