Abstract

One cannot manage information quality (IQ) without first being able to measure it meaningfully and establishing a causal connection between the source of IQ change, the IQ problem types, the types of activities affected, and their implications. In this article we propose a general IQ assessment framework. In contrast to context-specific IQ assessment models, which usually focus on a few variables determined by local needs, our framework consists of comprehensive typologies of IQ problems, related activities, and a taxonomy of IQ dimensions organized in a systematic way based on sound theories and practices. The framework can be used as a knowledge resource and as a guide for developing IQ measurement models for many different settings. The framework was validated and refined by developing specific IQ measurement models for two large-scale collections of two large classes of information objects: Simple Dublin Core records and online encyclopedia articles.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1720-1733
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology
Volume58
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2007

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Taxonomies
Acoustic waves
Information quality
Quality assessment
taxonomy
source of information
typology
resources
knowledge
Quality of information
Quality measurement
Measurement model
Taxonomy
Knowledge resources
Sources of information

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Software
  • Information Systems
  • Human-Computer Interaction
  • Computer Networks and Communications
  • Artificial Intelligence

Cite this

A framework for information quality assessment. / Stvilia, Besiki; Gasser, Les; Twidale, Michael B.; Smith, Linda C.

In: Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology, Vol. 58, No. 12, 01.10.2007, p. 1720-1733.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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